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conflict

Keeping Score in a Relationship is a Recipe for Conflict and Dissatisfaction

Black man arguing with woman, standing against wooden wall with folded arms, looking away with offended expression on her face
When people monitor their romantic relationship to see whether their partner reciprocates the nice things they do, conflicts have a greater impact on how close they feel to their partner.

COVID-19 and a Hope for Unity

image of children drawing a rainbow
Could COVID-19 be like the extra-terrestrials in alien-invasion movies—a precursor of hope?

How a Disagreement from 16 Years Ago Can Affect Your Health Today

Older woman with a very sad expression isolated on black
Although marriage often enhances people’s health, how and when partners argue with their spouses can have negative health consequences.

How the Political Primary Season Creates Psychological Tribes

Illustration of two groups of people engaged in a tug of war
What the number of dots on a screen, your taste in abstract art, and a boys’ summer camp can tell us about party division and unity.

Do Protest Songs Actually Affect People’s Attitudes about War and Peace?

Young man singing before crowd of people
When it comes to promoting peace, which works better: “Give peace a chance” or “War, what is it good for?”

A Little Perspective Goes a Long Way: Perspective Takers Are Liked More than Non-Perspective Takers

A woman looks across a telescope in front of a glass building

It may come as no surprise that political polarization is on the rise; liberals are becoming more liberal, and conservatives are becoming more conservative. This is more than simple disagreement; political polarization involves an extreme commitment to one’s ideology and an unwillingness to consider other viewpoints. According to Kristin Laurin from the University of British Columbia, we need to be willing to take the perspective of people with opposing views in order to combat political polarization. But how do people perceive those who engage in such perspective taking?

The Power of a Hug Can Help You Cope with Conflict

Image of an interracial couple embracing in a hug

Friends, children, romantic partners, family members – many of us exchange hugs with others on a regular basis. New research from the United States, published today in PLOS, now shows hugs can help us to cope with conflict in our daily life.

Hugs are considered a form of affectionate touch. Hugs occur between social partners of all types, and sometimes even strangers.

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